A small note about my ratings

Over the past few days, I discovered that many people have different ways of determining if a game is perfect for soloing. In my brief decision to make a review scale for solo games based off ten criteria, I soon discovered that I was going overboard with what I had initially wanted. Namely, a way for me to answer “can this game be soloable”. This is ironic, given how my statement, as stated from time to time, to play regular games solo and find out how they would be played solo.

I think what happened was that I had a shower thought, turned that into a crowdfunding idea, and then ran with it until I found out that, for the most part, people were quite happy with my regular formula and that I was adding to what was basically an unbroken format. So… Yeah. I guess it goes without saying that I won’t go through with the ratings scale and instead try to give a paragraph or two saying how an RPG I’m playing handled being solo, if it isn’t made during the session.

That said, if you enjoy the rating scale, feel free to use it still, just don’t hold it as the be all, end all of solo guidelines.

With that out of the way, I’m going to work on retelling a time I ran my first entire solo campaign.

Explaining Permutations

Okay, so I brought up the word “permutations” and it might have gotten people confused as to what I mean when using them in Solo RPGs.

So, I decided to make a special post detailing permutations in Solo Games and why I find them an important feature in a Solo RPG.

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Introducing my review scale!

I decided to create a review scale of how soloable a game is. How does one go about it? Well, I like to thank Todd Zircher for suggesting that I use a ten questions scale. I basically ask ten questions regarding the RPG’s soloability and then grade it based off how many it answered correctly.

As such, these are the ten questions and the criteria needed to answer them correctly.

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That Time I Played A Module And STILL Got Everyone Killed

At some point when I was playing D&D with Mythic, I was walking around a mall when I came across a calendar shop that sold board games on the side. One of them was a D&D Starter Box. Back then, D&D was in it’s fourth edition, the one where people agreed that it played more like an MMO than it did an RPG. I was unaware at the time, but D&D’s fourth edition was in its twilight years, as the version that would eventually become fifth edition, D&D Next, was in production.

Regardless, I bought the box, took it home, and realized its solo capabilities. Almost as soon as I was done doing the Mythic D&D experiment, I was right back into the fray. Rereading the liveblog I made so many years ago, it definitely falls in line with the writing I do now, to the point where it might be better for me to copy and paste snippets of the blog. So I will, but it’ll be in quotes so you get a better idea of where the old blog ends and the new blog begins.

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That Time I Had Mythic GM a Game for Me and Still Died Regardless

Naturally, there was a desire in me to do solo gaming. However, as my attempt to DM myself has shown, I’m prone to killing my own characters or giving myself challenges so hard, I might as well be lining up the party for the guillotine. That’s when, during my trawling through RPG.net, I came across a flash app for Mythic GM Emulator.

Had no idea what this was, but it looked cool. Then I read the forum and noticed it was a derivative of the Mythic GM Emulator so I decided to take a look at that. As soon as I got a good idea of what the rules were and how to keep track of notes and stuff, I was ready.

I set up the session as a sort of “game within a game” sort of deal. Where I, as a character, end up going to a D&D session where the GM is a large computer a la Deep Blue and two other characters play… well, characters. This was a way for me to not only introduce how Mythic is played to the audience, but also to help train myself to playing Mythic.

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