That Time I Played Maid RPG in My Zombie RPG Campaign And Completely Changed The Story

For the next session of my zombie survival campaign, I focused on the social table and figured I would change the system to better reflect that. Enter Maid RPG, the first Japanese RPG to be translated into English. This also marked the first time I’ve done a cross-game stat change, where I take characters from one game and restat them up in another game. The only other time I tried that was when I took multiple OSR characters and plopped them into Lamentations of the Flame Princess.

The game is practically a treasure trove of new content to discover and so, at one point, I’ll have to return to this game. But for now, I should get to the basics of what happened with this gameplay shift.

For one, it’s similar to Ghostbusters in that an attribute determines a D6 result. However, whereas Ghostbusters determines the number of dice you roll by the attribute you have, Maid RPG only multiplies the single dice roll you make by the attribute you have. There’s two more attributes for this, but I managed to do the exchange rather easily. Unfortunately, I lost the sheets I made, so… Yeah.

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That Time I Ran A Zombie Survival Campaign And Got The Hang Of It

I think I’ve stated this before, but the reason why I’ve fell in love with Solo RPG games is not only does it mean I get to play all these interesting games by myself, but also because they serve as a great writing tool most of the time, but on those really rare occasions, roleplaying solo turns into… less of an RPG and more of a TV show or story you’re reading as it unfolds.

While A Flower for Mara will always be my Solo RPG darling for having a huge, unnerving narrative about grief and revenge, I want to reminisce about a campaign I played solo that felt like its own television mini-series. I even gave it a name: One More Day Before the Storm. The premise was that, taking place after my D&D 4E game where Malareth had defeated the heroes and uses a powerful skull he has to zap me to parts unknown.

I said in the last post that my writing style had become similar enough to my current writing style that I could switch between what I had said already and what I wanted to say. For this, though, I could just as easily copy-paste the entire campaign onto this site, I feel like recapping the events would make this nine-chapter story brisker. Though, if you ever wanted to read the original text on this site, feel free to request it. If I get enough (about 5 sounds good), I’ll do just that.

The major purpose of this campaign was to play with Mythic again after not being able to use it much for the 4E game. This was before I recently found out how to twist the module so that it can be used with a solo engine, but that’s another story for another time. I also wanted to test out the Mythic Variations tables, which has different random event tables for different genres. The first one was an example, involving Zombies.

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A small note about my ratings

Over the past few days, I discovered that many people have different ways of determining if a game is perfect for soloing. In my brief decision to make a review scale for solo games based off ten criteria, I soon discovered that I was going overboard with what I had initially wanted. Namely, a way for me to answer “can this game be soloable”. This is ironic, given how my statement, as stated from time to time, to play regular games solo and find out how they would be played solo.

I think what happened was that I had a shower thought, turned that into a crowdfunding idea, and then ran with it until I found out that, for the most part, people were quite happy with my regular formula and that I was adding to what was basically an unbroken format. So… Yeah. I guess it goes without saying that I won’t go through with the ratings scale and instead try to give a paragraph or two saying how an RPG I’m playing handled being solo, if it isn’t made during the session.

That said, if you enjoy the rating scale, feel free to use it still, just don’t hold it as the be all, end all of solo guidelines.

With that out of the way, I’m going to work on retelling a time I ran my first entire solo campaign.

Introducing my review scale!

I decided to create a review scale of how soloable a game is. How does one go about it? Well, I like to thank Todd Zircher for suggesting that I use a ten questions scale. I basically ask ten questions regarding the RPG’s soloability and then grade it based off how many it answered correctly.

As such, these are the ten questions and the criteria needed to answer them correctly.

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That Time I Played A Module And STILL Got Everyone Killed

At some point when I was playing D&D with Mythic, I was walking around a mall when I came across a calendar shop that sold board games on the side. One of them was a D&D Starter Box. Back then, D&D was in it’s fourth edition, the one where people agreed that it played more like an MMO than it did an RPG. I was unaware at the time, but D&D’s fourth edition was in its twilight years, as the version that would eventually become fifth edition, D&D Next, was in production.

Regardless, I bought the box, took it home, and realized its solo capabilities. Almost as soon as I was done doing the Mythic D&D experiment, I was right back into the fray. Rereading the liveblog I made so many years ago, it definitely falls in line with the writing I do now, to the point where it might be better for me to copy and paste snippets of the blog. So I will, but it’ll be in quotes so you get a better idea of where the old blog ends and the new blog begins.

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That Time I Had Mythic GM a Game for Me and Still Died Regardless

Naturally, there was a desire in me to do solo gaming. However, as my attempt to DM myself has shown, I’m prone to killing my own characters or giving myself challenges so hard, I might as well be lining up the party for the guillotine. That’s when, during my trawling through RPG.net, I came across a flash app for Mythic GM Emulator.

Had no idea what this was, but it looked cool. Then I read the forum and noticed it was a derivative of the Mythic GM Emulator so I decided to take a look at that. As soon as I got a good idea of what the rules were and how to keep track of notes and stuff, I was ready.

I set up the session as a sort of “game within a game” sort of deal. Where I, as a character, end up going to a D&D session where the GM is a large computer a la Deep Blue and two other characters play… well, characters. This was a way for me to not only introduce how Mythic is played to the audience, but also to help train myself to playing Mythic.

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Stat It: Drachenkrieg

Nothing interests me more than an RPG that is specifically built around fanfiction. Yes, there are fan-made games based off existing material, but an RPG that is specifically about writing fanfiction is something I have never seen before.

Enter Reimagined. This game seems like a pretty nice game to try and solo, especially after it released an add-on based off a certain show that ended last month. Though, as I read the add-on, an idea sparked in my head…

What if I took this add-on, but used it to make a whole new setting to solo Reimagined on?

Okay, I should slow down and explain the premise. The game has you and another player write up fanfiction as though it was a TV show through a series of guidelines followed by a general scene set-up/resolution system. For me, though, I feel like writing up an original story using the add-on given to me. For you see, one could play it like Game of Thrones…

However, when I saw the Dragons table, I knew that I could do something else.

The realm of Mitteland had been ravaged by dragons for over a century. Mankind knew only to serve the Dragon Tyrants out of fear for their own life. However, a secret group of anti-dragon politicians have been conspiring against them in the hopes of freeing the realm from their claws.

Enter Johan, a man born from a dragon egg and the supposed last hope the realm has. This is a tale of the last Dragon War, of how Johan fought to save the humans from the Dragon Tyrants…

However, Drachenkrieg was cancelled before it could even end. However, I shall finally bring closure to this made up show!

So, going by the list of what one must do to create the story, I decided on the Fandom, the rating (Gen), the Yes/No content (Because I’m the only person playing the game, unless the sudden turn of events causes something I find uncomfortable, I’m kinda in control of the list), the type (Continuation), the flavor (Canon), and now I need to focus on the main characters.

So, there’s Johan, and then there’s his brother: Langdedrosa Cyanwrath. A pure-blooded dragon who looked down upon Johan when he was being raised by dragons. He had become a formidable rival to Johan, with the final episode of Season 7 having him take command of the other dragons.

Though, I should see what happened in the seasons prior to the final one to see what kind of story we’re looking at…

Here’s how it will work: I’m going to roll up BOLD seven times for each character to see what they were up to in the last seven seasons, starting them off with being together and ending with them on opposite sides…

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I Try To Become Mayor!

Just when I thought I saw the smallest RPG in the form of One-Page RPGs, along comes Clones, An Arnold RPG made by Erika Chappell of Newstand Press. How small is it? Well, the rules are all explained onto one business card.

Yes.

A business card.

I knew I couldn’t pass soloing this game, so here we go. The plot is that I’m a clone of a person and that I’m wanting to take over the world. Now, the game is meant to be played with multiple people, as each of them would give a list of skills for you to do, but since I’m playing solo, I’m gonna change it up a bit.

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The Voyager Goes On A Fantasy Trip

So, going into a journaling kick, I’m gonna play the Fantasy Trip solo engine. Now, I looked at the gaming system based off this engine and sufficed to say, I’m kinda interested. Now, I’m using the “In the Labyrinth” rule set, which expands a lot on the Fantasy Trip game.

Creating a character for this seems pretty straight forward. I have three stats, Strength, Dexterity, and IQ, to which I can spend eight points to increase. Going with a human Jack of All Trades with a 10 Strength, 10 Dexterity, and 11 IQ.

Each stat has different purposes, but if you’re familiar with OSR-style games, they’re pretty easy to understand. Strength (ST) is your health, spell slot, encumberment, and fortitude. Dexterity (DX) is your initiative, attack bonus, and reflex. IQ is your perception and willpower. However, IQ has something different, which is why I gave the remaining point to IQ. Effectively, they determine the feats and spells you acquire.

It’s a long story, but the point is that I have 11 IQ points to spend on any talent that isn’t higher than 11 IQ. Now, if seeing the ST, DX, and IQ acronyms make you think of GURPS, don’t worry. It’s not a coincidence. This system was made by Steve Jackson Games, who would later go on to make GURPS. One can even consider this the prototype of GURPS or even GURPS liter than lite.

This gives me some confidence in playing this game, as a gripe I had with some OSR games is that you don’t have any sort of choice in creating your character.

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