Stat It: The Tingleverse

Happy 2020! It’s a new year, a new decade, and a new day! So, let’s kick things off with trying something new!

If this is your first time on this site, word of warning: my preferred roleplaying style is gonzo. As in I like to go off the rails and into absurdity. Normally, this involves taking a game’s setting and turning it on its head, such as turning a LARP about grieving for a dearly departed friend into a full-blown primetime TV supernatural drama or take a cutesy game about Imperial Japanese warships being turned into anime women and have their commander be a black market arms dealer with the aforementioned anime women being his muscle.

However, if an RPG is gonzo in of itself, like an RPG set in a fantasy version of a Wendy’s restaurant where the main villain is Night King Ronald McDonald, then that immediately piques my interests. Such as the case with this game. Just… look at the cover! You have a shirtless dinosaur human cowboy, front and center, while he’s flanked by both Bigfoot and an elf archer, all while there’s tentacles going on… What’s not to like!?

 Welcome to the Tingleverse, an RPG based off some crazy novels that you can buy on Amazon! What’s it about? Well, it’s set in a universe where a variety of species have integrated themselves into society, ranging from the Bigfeet to the Dinosaurs, to even Unicorns and living objects. And thus, T-Rexes buying steaks and baseball playing motorcycles have become the norm for society.

Things are not so pleasant though, as monsters from a dark place known as the void often invade the Tingleverse. Some of these monsters were people just like us who were warped by the Void in an attempt to jump timelines while others are born right from the void itself.

Our story takes place in Billings, Montana of the good ol’ US of A, though altered to account for the Tingleverse, such as the lack of gunpowder or internet. Now, what kind of character shall I become?

Interestingly enough, the game’s system is a loose version of an OSR. It keeps the ability scores the same, but with the names altered. Constitution becomes Fortitude (ironically the name of the Saving Throw that uses Constitution in 3.5) Intelligence and Wisdom become Book/Street Smarts respectively, and Charisma becomes Charm, naturally.

Classes are easy to compare, with Bad Boys being Fighters, Charmers being Bards, Sneaks being Rogues, True Buckaroos being Clerics, and Wizards being… well… wizards. Though, this and the Alignments are where the similarities end. The races are pretty unique in terms of lore and stat distribution, while there’s a feature similar to Feats called Unique Ways that, mechanics wise, are completely different in how Feats go.

Namely, each Unique Way has an advantage and a disadvantage, with a huge stipulation to encourage roleplaying. For example, a character having Abs would help them in their Charm checks, but they need to spend some time doing sit ups to maintain them. Then, there are Cool Moves, which are special abilities that you can pick to customize your class.

Equipment gets a brief mention because not only do you start off with a bag of holding, but the selection of items mashes up an urban setting with a fantasy setting, kinda like Final Fantasy and Earthbound having a baby. The currency? US Dollars. Okay, that made me smile.

This is what I wanted out of an OSR game. A simplistic system that allows for character customization instead of having your character’s abilities and stats be fixed to a table. I really like this and now I want to roll up some characters. Let’s do it!

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Turning Storyline into a Solo RPG

I came across a board game similar to Once Upon A Time called Storyline. Picture Once Upon a Time and Apples to Apples having a baby. That is how Storyline do. To get into more detail, whereas Once Upon A Time plays as long as you want until you get to the ending, Storyline runs for 15 rounds, where the winner is determined through how many points they secured via tokens that they have to grab face down.

Storyline comes in two flavors: Fairy and Scary Tales. Obvious differences are obvious. But, this had me thinking of how to turn the assets into a driver for solo play, not unlike how I used Once Upon a Time as a makeshift Driver for solo.

Of course, this means creating a set of rules to make it solitaire friendly, since the game was intended to be played for three-to-eight players. Thankfully, I got the hard stuff out of the way thanks to overhauling Once Upon a Time.

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Mini-Rant: FATAL's Occupation System And Why It's Broken

While I dunked on FATAL so hard, I would recommend anything else to play, there’s one aspect of the game I did find interesting.

Rather than generic fantasy classes like Fighter, Wizard, and Rogue, we have Occupations. I found these interesting because they allow for roleplaying in different ways. While some of them do have direct parallels to a D&D class, most are simple, every day jobs that people take. Instead of doing a simple “save the world” plot as a brave, buff warrior, you could instead be a humble basket weaver.

And that’s what I love about that concept. It allows for different stories to be woven. However, there’s a bit of a problem.

Advancement points.

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Tales of the Winter Alien

So, for my Memorial Day game, I decided to go back to the very first one I did: Winter. This time, with all the tools I had learned over these past 5 years, as well as the devices I was given. Now, instead of choosing from one of three lines, I’m going to make up a new line using the BOLD.

  • Waylay Problem: 8 & 9, otherworldly.
  • Waylay Modifier: 21, harsh.
  • Waylay Solution: 5, Enemy Help.

Hmmm… This might be interesting… Alright, let’s do a five-minute freewrite.

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The 100th FATAL Session

Let’s get the elephant out of the room here.

I’m going to be playing the most infamous RPG in all of history. The reason it’s so infamous is because of its excessive nudity, violence, racism, sexism, and other such dark themes, all handled with the same maturity as a fart joke. Most every reviewer that’s tackled this game have brought it up time and time again about how bad it is.

But the gameplay is seldom touched upon except if it’s related to the aforementioned themes, such as gender-specific stat boosts, jobs involving… erm… hiding the weasel, or even spells one could find better versions of in the Book of Erotic Fantasy. I heard bits and pieces of how bad the gameplay is, like how the levelling system is broken, as it gives you XP depending on what mundane activity you do. For melee-style classes like the Gladiator, it’s via how much damage you do. Get three of these classes and you can level up faster than an average character in D&D.

Part of the reason I’m doing this is to see if the RPG can be stomached by removing these dark elements. The other part? Gotta mark the 100th session with something.

Actually, my character doesn’t start at base level 1. He’s 56 years old and began roughly around the age between 7 and 10. I then calculate the square root of the years he’s been in the job and I get my level of 7…

… Why did I need to do complex math to figure that out?

So, now I gotta quickly level up my character six times. Thankfully this just means skill points to distribute. This means I roll 7d10 to get the number of points to put in. This is on top of the skill points I get from my race (a d8 minus 1) for a grand total of 45 points.

… It turns out I gotta roll that dice 55 more times… What. The. Fu-

Abandon All Hope, Ye Who Enter

Can’t Catch Me, I’m The Gingerbread Man!

Now, originally I was gonna do Marvel Superheroes as my penultimate 99th game, but then I saw that there’s a new Once Upon A Time expansion. You know what this means. Another Once Upon A Mythic Time game. Which is rather fitting because one of the very first sessions I did on this site was Once Upon A Mythic Time.

The premise this time around is Fairy Tale mashups, so instead of generic characters for our story, we’re going to be encountering established characters like Snow White, Cinderella, and Goldilocks. Same rules as before, assuming you have read them, and let’s go about this.

My character is the Gingerbread Man, his aspect is Full (I’m assuming he’s stuffed with some fondant) and his three items are beans, a beanstalk, and herbs. Herbs are an Interrupt. Our ending is…

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Stat It: The Feast of Legends

So, I’ve kinda established myself as a gamer who goes to the absurd for his solo games, whether it be playing a simplified D6 system based off Snakes on a Plane, playing a simplistic combat-heavy game just to say my character beat up Hitler, using the common ancestor of all RPGs to play out a rat invasion, or even outright playing the worst RPG ever just to see if it can be solo’d.

Well, I can say that I’ve been out absurded…

There’s an RPG made by Wendy’s. I’m not making this up.

Feast of Legends is its name and I gotta say, it’s absolutely legit. Rather than it being a meme RPG where it just apes the D20 system and gives you a silly setting based off Wendy’s stuff, it instead has its own unique system and while it does base its setting off Wendy’s products, it’s not entirely blatant advertising.

Okay, a bit of a stretch, considering how the entire plot of the campaign in its rulebook is that we have to fight a monster called the Ice Jester. If you know anything about Wendy’s, you know that they pride themselves off having fresh, never frozen patties. And I don’t think I need to say who the Jester represents.

In a way, it’s an official version of that Disney & Nintendo vs. WB & Sony campaign I made years ago, where Mickey was regarded as the Jesus Christ of cartoons and the Looney Tunes were akin to pagan gods.

So, naturally, I want to play a game of this. And so, the first thing I do is Stat It.

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