The 100th FATAL Session

Let’s get the elephant out of the room here.

I’m going to be playing the most infamous RPG in all of history. The reason it’s so infamous is because of its excessive nudity, violence, racism, sexism, and other such dark themes, all handled with the same maturity as a fart joke. Most every reviewer that’s tackled this game have brought it up time and time again about how bad it is.

But the gameplay is seldom touched upon except if it’s related to the aforementioned themes, such as gender-specific stat boosts, jobs involving… erm… hiding the weasel, or even spells one could find better versions of in the Book of Erotic Fantasy. I heard bits and pieces of how bad the gameplay is, like how the levelling system is broken, as it gives you XP depending on what mundane activity you do. For melee-style classes like the Gladiator, it’s via how much damage you do. Get three of these classes and you can level up faster than an average character in D&D.

Part of the reason I’m doing this is to see if the RPG can be stomached by removing these dark elements. The other part? Gotta mark the 100th session with something.

Actually, my character doesn’t start at base level 1. He’s 56 years old and began roughly around the age between 7 and 10. I then calculate the square root of the years he’s been in the job and I get my level of 7…

… Why did I need to do complex math to figure that out?

So, now I gotta quickly level up my character six times. Thankfully this just means skill points to distribute. This means I roll 7d10 to get the number of points to put in. This is on top of the skill points I get from my race (a d8 minus 1) for a grand total of 45 points.

… It turns out I gotta roll that dice 55 more times… What. The. Fu-

Abandon All Hope, Ye Who Enter

Can’t Catch Me, I’m The Gingerbread Man!

Now, originally I was gonna do Marvel Superheroes as my penultimate 99th game, but then I saw that there’s a new Once Upon A Time expansion. You know what this means. Another Once Upon A Mythic Time game. Which is rather fitting because one of the very first sessions I did on this site was Once Upon A Mythic Time.

The premise this time around is Fairy Tale mashups, so instead of generic characters for our story, we’re going to be encountering established characters like Snow White, Cinderella, and Goldilocks. Same rules as before, assuming you have read them, and let’s go about this.

My character is the Gingerbread Man, his aspect is Full (I’m assuming he’s stuffed with some fondant) and his three items are beans, a beanstalk, and herbs. Herbs are an Interrupt. Our ending is…

Continue reading

Stat It: The Feast of Legends

So, I’ve kinda established myself as a gamer who goes to the absurd for his solo games, whether it be playing a simplified D6 system based off Snakes on a Plane, playing a simplistic combat-heavy game just to say my character beat up Hitler, using the common ancestor of all RPGs to play out a rat invasion, or even outright playing the worst RPG ever just to see if it can be solo’d.

Well, I can say that I’ve been out absurded…

There’s an RPG made by Wendy’s. I’m not making this up.

Feast of Legends is its name and I gotta say, it’s absolutely legit. Rather than it being a meme RPG where it just apes the D20 system and gives you a silly setting based off Wendy’s stuff, it instead has its own unique system and while it does base its setting off Wendy’s products, it’s not entirely blatant advertising.

Okay, a bit of a stretch, considering how the entire plot of the campaign in its rulebook is that we have to fight a monster called the Ice Jester. If you know anything about Wendy’s, you know that they pride themselves off having fresh, never frozen patties. And I don’t think I need to say who the Jester represents.

In a way, it’s an official version of that Disney & Nintendo vs. WB & Sony campaign I made years ago, where Mickey was regarded as the Jesus Christ of cartoons and the Looney Tunes were akin to pagan gods.

So, naturally, I want to play a game of this. And so, the first thing I do is Stat It.

Continue reading

Stat It: Marvel Super Heroes

So, I decided to play Marvel Super Heroes for my penultimate RPG before the big ol’ 100th, and thus, I’m going to stat up my very own character. The reason I decided to play MSH was because of Gammazon’s game where he plays as Spider-Man. It brought back a lot of fond memories of me reading the books and thus encouraged me to do this instead of a fully fledged game of Maid RPG (though that’ll come after the 100th session).

Like in the other Marvel RPG, I’ll be doing three heroes, one of them will be premade, the other will be randomly generated, and the last one will be crafted by myself. Unlike the other RPG, I’ll be going in reverse order, since I have a character in mind.

Continue reading

Road to FATAL 3: What and How

So, one question that can be asked is “what am I going to do in FATAL”. Namely, what sort of story I’m going to tackle.

While it’d make sense to have a story about Abeloa rising to the top in the gladiatorial arena, I remembered that FATAL had a small adventure to get people adjusted to the game, so I figured, why not use that? The idea is that, when they’re not fighting in the arena, Gladiators are often picked out to do dangerous tasks. The more dangerous the task is, the more money they get or even some months off their service (they surrender their rights for 5 years when they become Gladiators).

Abeloa is one of the most requested gladiators due to his strength, but because Gladiators come at a first-come, first-serve basis, rather than do something cool like an assassination attempt, he’s instead hired by a kid whose entire hamlet has been abducted. Begrudgingly, Abeloa accepts (he has no choice to reject) and he prepares to go on his journey.

That’s basically it. Now comes the final question: how am I going to play FATAL. Well, as I said, I’ll be bringing a suite of my favorite Engine and Drivers, all while testing out a new one.

See, while I could play the adventure as is, I could also spice it up with a little help from RPG Tips. For those not in the know, there’s a new system for playing adventures that has caught my eye. It follows the approach of stripping the adventure down to its base elements, then restructuring it to make due with the randomness of the Engines. Now, I made a few scripts based off movies and an adventure, so I have a bit of experience with this.

To save you the nitty gritty, I’ve done the script and the link will be right here.

I’ll explain how it works when I play the game, but for now, I’ll run you through the tools I’ll be bringing to the table.

Of course, I’ll be bringing CRGE Kai to the mix, as I love it deeply. For Drivers, I’ll be bringing the Tangent Zero dice for when events are altered and the Adventure Crafter for when events get interrupted.

… Okay, this was pretty straight forward. So… yeah, bon voyage, gamers.

That Time I Played Maid RPG in My Zombie RPG Campaign And Completely Changed The Story

For the next session of my zombie survival campaign, I focused on the social table and figured I would change the system to better reflect that. Enter Maid RPG, the first Japanese RPG to be translated into English. This also marked the first time I’ve done a cross-game stat change, where I take characters from one game and restat them up in another game. The only other time I tried that was when I took multiple OSR characters and plopped them into Lamentations of the Flame Princess.

The game is practically a treasure trove of new content to discover and so, at one point, I’ll have to return to this game. But for now, I should get to the basics of what happened with this gameplay shift.

For one, it’s similar to Ghostbusters in that an attribute determines a D6 result. However, whereas Ghostbusters determines the number of dice you roll by the attribute you have, Maid RPG only multiplies the single dice roll you make by the attribute you have. There’s two more attributes for this, but I managed to do the exchange rather easily. Unfortunately, I lost the sheets I made, so… Yeah.

Continue reading

That Time I Ran A Zombie Survival Campaign And Got The Hang Of It

I think I’ve stated this before, but the reason why I’ve fell in love with Solo RPG games is not only does it mean I get to play all these interesting games by myself, but also because they serve as a great writing tool most of the time, but on those really rare occasions, roleplaying solo turns into… less of an RPG and more of a TV show or story you’re reading as it unfolds.

While A Flower for Mara will always be my Solo RPG darling for having a huge, unnerving narrative about grief and revenge, I want to reminisce about a campaign I played solo that felt like its own television mini-series. I even gave it a name: One More Day Before the Storm. The premise was that, taking place after my D&D 4E game where Malareth had defeated the heroes and uses a powerful skull he has to zap me to parts unknown.

I said in the last post that my writing style had become similar enough to my current writing style that I could switch between what I had said already and what I wanted to say. For this, though, I could just as easily copy-paste the entire campaign onto this site, I feel like recapping the events would make this nine-chapter story brisker. Though, if you ever wanted to read the original text on this site, feel free to request it. If I get enough (about 5 sounds good), I’ll do just that.

The major purpose of this campaign was to play with Mythic again after not being able to use it much for the 4E game. This was before I recently found out how to twist the module so that it can be used with a solo engine, but that’s another story for another time. I also wanted to test out the Mythic Variations tables, which has different random event tables for different genres. The first one was an example, involving Zombies.

Continue reading

A small note about my ratings

Over the past few days, I discovered that many people have different ways of determining if a game is perfect for soloing. In my brief decision to make a review scale for solo games based off ten criteria, I soon discovered that I was going overboard with what I had initially wanted. Namely, a way for me to answer “can this game be soloable”. This is ironic, given how my statement, as stated from time to time, to play regular games solo and find out how they would be played solo.

I think what happened was that I had a shower thought, turned that into a crowdfunding idea, and then ran with it until I found out that, for the most part, people were quite happy with my regular formula and that I was adding to what was basically an unbroken format. So… Yeah. I guess it goes without saying that I won’t go through with the ratings scale and instead try to give a paragraph or two saying how an RPG I’m playing handled being solo, if it isn’t made during the session.

That said, if you enjoy the rating scale, feel free to use it still, just don’t hold it as the be all, end all of solo guidelines.

With that out of the way, I’m going to work on retelling a time I ran my first entire solo campaign.