Mortzes and Ricksters: Post Mortym

So, having finished playing the Rick and Morty dungeon module, I have quite a lot of thoughts on both playing the module and playing it solo. Of course, minor spoilers for the module ahead:

As a stand-alone dungeon, this is one of the more unique dungeons I have ever played in. Not every room is a straight forward “kill all the bad guys” scenario and in fact some of the rooms actively discourage you from killing or otherwise have a heavy emphasis on roleplaying being the solution. The writing is also rather humorous (it helps that meta humor is my favorite type) and, in the hands of the right DM, has the potential to be the funniest officially published D&D Adventure for the Fifth Edition. Maybe even just D&D in general.

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Mortzes And Ricksters Part 2: It’s A Far Out Game

Alright, in this post, we’ll try to finish the dungeon featured in the Rick and Morty D&D Game: The Lost Dungeon of Rickedness. When we last left off our heroes, they had just resolved a conflict between people with asses and people without asses. Like that Dr. Seuss book on crack. And now, we continue onwards.

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Mortzes and Ricksters

Stranger Things wasn’t the only franchise to get the D&D crossover treatment. In the exact same year, we would get a second crossover starter box, this time focusing on the Rick and Morty series. The difference between the two boxed sets are night and day, and that’s going beyond the obvious fact that the two shows are of different tones.

Stranger Things’ Boxed Set gives you a rather cut and paste recreation of the Player’s Handbook from the previous starter box. It’s mini-adventure did a little better at tying to the source material beyond just including the Upside Down and the Demogorgon by including plot elements from the in-universe campaign and piecing together what they think the adventure was.

Rick and Morty, however, has its signature, cynical humor written throughout the entire box as Rick riffs on the normal Player’s Handbook. Obviously, whoever made this knows that there’s already three starter boxes that have a player’s handbook (The first one with the Lost Mine, Stranger Things, and Essentials Kit) and decided “Okay, I doubt anyone’s gonna buy this as their first product in D&D so I might as well have some fun!”

Hell, the writing is so authentically Rick that I’d be surprised if it was one of the writers of the actual show behind the pen. This is made all the more hilarious because instead of just screenshots from the show, the images are drawn comic panels with jokes relevant to the topic they’re attached to. Honestly, it’s worth hunting down a copy just for this alone if you’re a big fan of either Rick and Morty or comedy in general.

Another major difference is that whereas Stranger Things was primarily a short, one-shot adventure not unlike the ones you’d see for D&D Encounters, the Rick and Morty spin-off has an entire dungeon, filled with 40 rooms for the party to explore, making it more akin to something like Dungeon of the Mad Mage than, say, Dragon Heist.

But you want me to get to the part where I play a game and make up a story with the assistance of dice tables that determine yes or no questions and occasionally create plot twists. Well, before we do so, allow me to establish some backstory for these characters since the game, still being written in the humor of Rick and Morty, throws us into a dungeon with nary any detail in contrast to the Stranger Things crossover where we have a bit of backstory as to why we’re hunting the Thessalhydra.

  • Ari Strongbow lost her brother to a raid by Orcs and wants revenge. Her mentor and father figure, Kiir Bravan, sticks with her because he believes she might go down a dark path.
  • Keth Silverson was an orphan who steals everything from everyone. Lyan Amaranthia, instead of arresting him for a bounty, chooses to instead take him in and teach him how to live his best life.
  • Matthias Fabian was a prince of the Fabian Family before a curse placed on him by the Colonel turned his family into mindless barbarians. Matthias survived the bloodbath, but escaped with his mind scathed, now being only known as Meatface.
  • Kiir met up with Lyan and the two pairs became one as Lyan put her faith in the wizard father figure. Ari, while the appearance of Keth reminded her of the raid, also reminded him of her brother and decided to treat him as though he were her brother. Meatface just joined because they were gonna smash heads in.

And now, we can begin. Now, the module gives us a rather elaborate dungeon done in the classic blue and white color scheme commonly associated with old D&D maps. Fun fact: the reason they were blue is to prevent photocopying back then. However, it’s more of a layout. Most of the rooms are vacant appearance wise save for a few that have evocative designs.

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The Voyager Hunts For The Thessalhydra

Happy April, everyone. Today, I’m going to be doing something special. The D&D Adventure I’ll be playing, Hunt for the Thessalhydra, seemed to have been written in a notebook and then published by Hasbro Gaming, presumably cleaning up and digitizing the text that was written into the notebook, though keeping some pretty nice drawings done by someone named “Will the Wise”. The aesthetic is interesting enough for me to play it, so that’s what we’re going to do today.

There’s five premade characters I’ll be using. Let’s get an introduction to them, shall we?

  • Adam, a Half-Elf Wizard who is devoted to a god despite not being a cleric. I would assume that, with Elama, a Wood Elf Cleric, took him in as her own (right down to getting a trait from her known as Mask of the Wild) where they worship the deity known as Naralis Analor.
  • Baggi, a Half-Orc Ranger who has explored the far reaches of the realm with her companion Cadman, a Human Paladin who doubles as a mercenary.
  • And lastly, Dain, who is a Dwarf Bard who just wants to entertain.

This will be an interesting game and the notes from the adventure creator, Mike Wheeler, gives some nice advice about DMing a game. While it’s indicating that these are notes for himself, the way it’s all described, it feels more like the standard advice you’d get from a starter’s box… Strange.

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Ravenloft, Chapter 1: The Executioner

So, a long while ago, I statted up a D&D character and had a decent campaign ahead of him. Now, allow me to return and give him the full treatment he deserves. His very own Ravenloft campaign. Not only that, but Philip is also getting played on Foundry, a program I had taken a look at, so that’ll be an interesting way to see how the game unfolds. This will be a review for how Foundry plays compared to Astral.

To briefly recap on his backstory: Philip is a druid who took on a job that ended in a werewolf being lynched by a xenophobic Burgomaster and Philip plots to kill him in revenge. He also recently pissed off some cultists after mucking about in one of their HQs, a house they turned into a death trap.

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Stat It: Ravenloft

Alright, I’m gonna start getting back into solo roleplaying by doing several Stat Its. These will be for the characters I’ve created using the Nine Questions, and we’ll be starting off with the system I know off by heart, D&D 5E.

Assisting me is the Backstory Cards. I picked up the first expansion and figured that it could help me flesh out my druid a bit. To recap on what happened, my character is a druid who hails from a Strahd-worshipping village near Yester Hill. In his quest to protect the weak, he obtained a target in the form of a burgomaster who had lynched a werewolf. He currently is working under his hand to get closer and strike him when his defense is down.

But that’s just it. Other than that bit of backstory, nothing else is said about him. Well, it’s time for me to flesh him out. It’s a good thing that the player’s handbook has a third of its book devoted to step by step character creation.

First off, I gotta pick a race. I’m probably gonna pick human since that’s an easy one. Going with a human variant. And obviously, I’m going with Druid. Figuring out what to do for levels, I decided to stick for Level 3, on the assumption that my character went through the events of the adventure “The Beast”, getting away with fourteen thousand experience points.

After outfitting him with some of the items he starts off with (he traded in a Whip of Warning that he found for a Scimitar of Warning), I also give him the Circle of the Land. The circle he chose is naturally swamp to match the bleak nature of Barovia. My spell list is as follows: Continue reading

How Long Would The Battle At Balin’s Tomb Be In D&D? Let’s Found Out!

So I’ve been playing D&D lately, and I always noticed a rule of thumb when doing combat. Each round of combat represents six seconds in time. I always find this funny, since sometimes, in less than a minute, everybody who isn’t a hero is disemboweled and dead on the ground. Even more so when we have lengthy combat discussions outside of character, and yet the entire combat took place in a tenth of that time.

It doesn’t really do the epic fantasy battles justice, right? Well… I decided to take a few battles across various fantasy genres to see how well they fare in terms of combat timing and D&D rulings. D&D’s most common inspiration, Lord of the Rings, will be saved for last. However, we’re gonna look at two aspects of combat, a more grounded in reality version of combat and a more fantastical version.

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Creating an NPC using Tarokka Cards

Hey everyone. Sorry for the lack of updates. I somehow got swamped with a massive amount of business in my real life so I had to take stuff down a notch. The next couple of posts will be filler posts until I end up getting back on track and working on more solo sessions.

To start this post off, I am in love with the current D&D Storyline: Curse of Strahd. While I wasn’t around when the Ravenloft setting was beloved back in the day, a D&D veteran’s summary on the setting had me sold on it and when Wizards of the Coast announced that the next series adventures would be set in Ravenloft, I immediately squeed.

So, I figured that, if I were to do any solo gaming on D&D 5e using an official adventure, it would either be the Tyranny of Dragons story line (the first) or Curse of Strahd. However, I decided to create a character based off the latter’s use of the Tarokka Deck, Ravenloft’s answer to the Tarot Deck. As such, the setting I have in mind is gothic and full of terrors. Continue reading

Dungeon Crawling With Google Docs

Now, given how this is the last Monday of GM Month, I figured I’d do a GM-related thing. And what better way than to return to the artificial GM that kicked my solo roleplaying into overdrive: Mythic. As it stands, I played most of my games with this Emulator, since it’s the one I’m most familiar with. I’ve first played this with D&D 3rd Edition (as almost all the rules were online for free), but now I feel like I should do my first Solo RPG with Mythic and 5e. Well, sort of. I did a bit of a solo game with 5e, but that was more for writing a story than anything else.

There’s another reason I’m doing this: I’m testing out the new Mythic Addon and seeing how it plays out in game. Who knows? Maybe this will be the norm for how I write stuff. Let’s begin. I’ll grab myself a pregen from Tabletopping, with me being a level five Dragonborn Champion (Fighter). Let’s do the example scenario to get us started. Continue reading